PLAYING AGGRO IN CENTURION - RICCARDO PIRACCINI [ENG]

PLAYING AGGRO IN CENTURION


The return to paper has begun; new, juicy tournaments are on the horizon and I, an avid aggro player, have already begun to wonder which decks are currently the best within this archetype. In today's article, I propose the product of my elucubrations, in the hope of providing some ideas to those who are already experts in the noble art of "tapping creatures " and getting the attention of those who want to approach it.


In this brief analysis I will start from the various aggro categories and I will indicate for each the deck, or decks, that have been most successful in recent events, but I will also list those that, although less played, represent in my opinion valid and interesting alternatives.


GIMMICK (Aggro-Combo)


Let's start with the gimmick category, which includes those decks that spend all their resources to make a specific and very powerful play, not necessarily insta-win. Queen of the sub-archetype is Magda, Brazen Outlaw: this deck stands out from the others thanks to its ability to turn the game inexorably in its favor already in the fourth turn, bringing in a Sundering Titan or a Bogardan Hellkite depending on the needs. A quick and fairly flexible aggro, Magda is particularly effective against fair decks and decks that develop their play in the mid-late game.


Other options:


Hogaak, Arisen Necropolis, Extus, Oriq Overlord // Awaken the Blood Avatar


TEMPO


Two tied decks in the tempo category: Geist of Saint Traft and Killian, Ink Duelist. The first, a historical presence in the format, adopts a classic and efficient tempo strategy with many interactions and a fast beater in the command zone that is able, among other things, to protect itself. In the second, however, the tempo component comes from the numerous protections and auras which, thanks to the discount provided by the commander, make it possible to create an evasive and difficult to remove threat from the third turn, capable of taking the game home in a few turns.

The biggest difference between the two decks lies in the matchups: if Geist has an advantage against combo decks and suffers from decks that flood the field with creatures, Killian has a distinct advantage over creature-based decks thanks to the lifelink ability, but he plays almost no interaction capable of interfering with a combo plan.


Other options:


Tymna the Weaver, Kalamax, the Stormsire


LINEAR AGGRO


Here we enter the category of aggro which probably has the highest number of sub-archetypes (e.g., white wheenie, zoo, stompy, burn, affinity, scales, soul sisters ...). Here the real difference is made by the efficiency with which a deck associates a backup plan with the main one. The two decks that I think do best of all are Isamaru, Hound of Konda and Adeliz, the Cinder Wind. The legendary big dog has at his disposal all the best hatebears of white, which allow him to maintain constant pressure on the board and, at the same time, to significantly slow down the opponent's play from the first turns. Adeliz, on the other hand, exploits the affinity of the tribe of wizards with instants and sorceries to play a substantial number of burn spells and low-cost interactions. This in turn provides the deck with good flexibility and the ability to follow an aggro plan, a burn plan, or, when the commander is out, an explosive combination of the two.